• Adem Cain posted an update 2 months, 3 weeks ago

    , 2005) – 3225 people took part. The cohort has been followed up subsequently. Participants completed questionnaires about mental wellbeing and neighbourhood cohesion at a mean age of 73.2 years. The MRC National Survey of Health and Development (1946 cohort) grew out of a maternity survey of all mothers who had a baby in England, Scotland, or Wales in one week in March 1946. The cohort was originally based on 5362 participants and has been followed-up through childhood and adult life (Kuh et al., 2011). Participants completed questionnaires about mental wellbeing and neighbourhood cohesion between 60 and 64 years (mean age 63.6 years) before a clinic or home visit. The National Child Development Study (1958 cohort) was originally based on over 17,000 live births in Great Britain during one week in 1958 (Power and Elliott, 2006). The cohort has been followed-up through childhood and adult life. Participants completed questionnaires about mental wellbeing and neighbourhood cohesion at a mean age 50.7 years. Wellbeing was assessed using the Warwick-Edinburgh Mental Wellbeing Scale (WEMWBS) (Tennant et al., 2007). This scale was developed to measure a wide conception of mental wellbeing, including positive Natural Product Library affect, psychological functioning (autonomy, competence, self acceptance, personal growth) and interpersonal relationships. It has been validated on a representative general population sample of adults and confirmatory factor analysis suggests it measures a single underlying concept (Tennant et al., 2007). The scale consists of 14 positively-worded statements. Examples include ‘I’ve been feeling interested in other people’, ‘I’ve been dealing with problems well’, ‘I’ve been feeling good about myself’. For each statement, respondents are asked to indicate which of five options – ranging from none of the time (score 1) to all of the time (score 5) – best describes their experience over the preceding two weeks. The overall score is calculated by summing the scores for each item. A higher score indicates a higher level of mental wellbeing. A few participants (<1%) had missing data on 1 or more items. The Cronbach alpha for the 14 items in all three cohorts was 0.91, showing high internal consistency. Sense of neighbourhood cohesion was assessed using eight items from the 18-item Neighbourhood Cohesion Scale that was developed to measure sense of community and attraction to neighbourhood (Buckner, 1988 and Lochner et al., 1999). Examples include ‘I feel like I belong to this neighbourhood’, ‘and ‘I would be willing to work together with others on something to improve my neighbourhood’’.